GUELPH POLITICAST #85 – Celebrating Celebrations of Guelph

This week’s Guelph Politicast kind of shakes up the format. Typically these are interviews with people, or clips of speeches either partial or whole, but on this pod I wanted to tell you a story, and that story is a tale of Guelph as we start the countdown to the Royal City’s 200th birthday in just 10 years time. Continue reading “GUELPH POLITICAST #85 – Celebrating Celebrations of Guelph”

Guelph Library Premieres 8 Short Films About Guelph

Much of the action at the East End Library Branch’s block party to celebrate Canada 150 was, naturally, outdoors, but there was something interesting happening inside too: Eight short films about Guelph by eight local filmmakers. Covering a wide variety of topics, the shorts each show a side of Guelph – known and unknown – that highlighted the reasons why the Royal City is the place that it is. Continue reading “Guelph Library Premieres 8 Short Films About Guelph”

How the Guelph Mercury Covered Vimy Ridge

The attack began Easter Monday, April 9, 1917. By the time it was over, Canada had secured its place in history as an army, as a nation, and as a people, and we’ve come to understand that deeply in the last 100 years. But I wondered: how was the battle seen at the time, how was it read and understood by the people of Guelph through their daily newspaper? To the microfiche! Continue reading “How the Guelph Mercury Covered Vimy Ridge”

GUELPH POLITICAST #56 – Ed Butts, Local Historian and Author

Every November 11, wreaths are laid and poppies are left at the Cenotaph at the corner of Woolwich and Eramosa. On this corner, in the centre of town, there’s a wall of names memorializing those Guelphites that fought and died in the two World Wars and the Korean War, but how often does the average Guelphite in 2016 read those names? How often do we think about those lives lost, or who those people even were when they died in the killing fields of Europe and Asia? Continue reading “GUELPH POLITICAST #56 – Ed Butts, Local Historian and Author”

When Terry Passed Through Town

Sandwiched between an article announcing that the new MacDonald-Stewart Art Centre would be opening in November, and pictures of the visiting Canadian Hearing Society’s mobile van on page 3 of the July 17 edition of The Daily Mercury was a notice. A young man named Terry Fox was running his way across Canada in a “Marathon of Hope” in order to raise money and awareness for cancer research, and his long journey was to bring him to Guelph that coming Tuesday. Continue reading “When Terry Passed Through Town”