Let’s Tour Doors Open Guelph!

It’s time again for the annual celebration of local heritage by going behind the scenes in some of Guelph’s many famous and historically relevant buildings with Doors Open Guelph. Guelph Politico is taking part by trying to see how many sites I can visit during the day with 15 different stops spread out across the City.

You can follow along with the adventure on my Instagram feed for updates throughout the day from 10 am till 4 pm. Afterward, the complete collection of posts will be displayed in the Storify post below.

Doors Open Guelph Tour 2017

Doors Open Guelph Tour 2017

Here’s all the places I went duting the annual Guelph Arts Council Tour

  1. GUELPH POLITICO – Behind the Scenes at the Petrie Building
  2. About a dozen people here first thing for my first stop on the @doorsopenguelph tour, London House. It was built in the 1890s by John Sully, who was a carpenter and part owner of Raymond Sewing Machine Co. There are details outside and inside that reflect Sully's 2 worlds, the sewing and the carpentry and you can see them on the third floor here. Unfortunately there was no pictures inside, but this was totally a great place to start this morning. (And already very busy.)

    About a dozen people here first thing for my first stop on the @doorsopenguelph tour, London House. It was built in the 1890s by John Sully, who was a carpenter and part owner of Raymond Sewing Machine Co. There are details outside and inside that reflect Sully’s 2 worlds, the sewing and the carpentry and you can see them on the third floor here. Unfortunately there was no pictures inside, but this was totally a great place to start this morning. (And already very busy.)
  3. At St George's Anglican Church now, the third to bear the name, built on 2 plots of land by the river when the original congregation it St George's Square (hence the name) grew too big for the comfort of surrounding merchants. Rumour has it that the yellow stained glass window in the hallway is from the original church.

    At St George’s Anglican Church now, the third to bear the name, built on 2 plots of land by the river when the original congregation it St George’s Square (hence the name) grew too big for the comfort of surrounding merchants. Rumour has it that the yellow stained glass window in the hallway is from the original church.
  4. Don here is a fountain of St George's and local history. He sits next to a pot that through a confluence of events found it's way from the court of Napoleon (Yes, that Napoleon) to St George's where it was very utilitarian until someone discovered it's significance.

    Don here is a fountain of St George’s and local history. He sits next to a pot that through a confluence of events found it’s way from the court of Napoleon (Yes, that Napoleon) to St George’s where it was very utilitarian until someone discovered it’s significance.
  5. Sharing this from the observation seat of the Canadian Pacific Caboose. It was built in 1941 and was used for over 40 years. The Guelph Historical Railway Association spent 16 years restoring it.

    Sharing this from the observation seat of the Canadian Pacific Caboose. It was built in 1941 and was used for over 40 years. The Guelph Historical Railway Association spent 16 years restoring it.
  6. Here is some original stationary from the Albion Hotel. The original phone number was 2033!

    Here is some original stationary from the Albion Hotel. The original phone number was 2033!
  7. There's a longish line here at the Albion to take the tour. Our guide is Linda, daughter of Bill Misurka who owned it from 1969-82. The second floor here was still rooms in the early 80s. The windows at the back here denote where a room was back in the day. The guests were long term, down on their luck or homeless types.

    There’s a longish line here at the Albion to take the tour. Our guide is Linda, daughter of Bill Misurka who owned it from 1969-82. The second floor here was still rooms in the early 80s. The windows at the back here denote where a room was back in the day. The guests were long term, down on their luck or homeless types.
  8. Number 1 curiosity of the Albion, The "Gates to heaven". You can see a remnant here, but they've been boarded up for decades, and have likely collapsed in places. Were they used as a secret entrance for the priests and the nuns? Were they used to get fresh spring water from the aquafer beneath Our Lady? Were they used for Prohibition? Who knows?

    Number 1 curiosity of the Albion, The “Gates to heaven”. You can see a remnant here, but they’ve been boarded up for decades, and have likely collapsed in places. Were they used as a secret entrance for the priests and the nuns? Were they used to get fresh spring water from the aquafer beneath Our Lady? Were they used for Prohibition? Who knows?
  9. I've lived in #Guelph for 15 years and I've never been inside before...

    I’ve lived in #Guelph for 15 years and I’ve never been inside before…
  10. This is the chavet of the Basilica of Our Lady. It's a circular passageway behind the alter that features a number of shrines of importance to Guelph Catholics.

    This is the chavet of the Basilica of Our Lady. It’s a circular passageway behind the alter that features a number of shrines of importance to Guelph Catholics.
  11. Fun facts about the Basilica: 4 people are buried in the basement, the founders of the church; when they renovated in 2014 they created an "overflow confessional"; the towers were added almost 4 decades after the church was built; and, until recently, they were slowly moving away from the main building until they were reinforced.

    Fun facts about the Basilica: 4 people are buried in the basement, the founders of the church; when they renovated in 2014 they created an “overflow confessional”; the towers were added almost 4 decades after the church was built; and, until recently, they were slowly moving away from the main building until they were reinforced.
  12. Behind the scenes at Silence. This is the "green room" where musicians can rest and recreate. They also rent out this space to the community.

    Behind the scenes at Silence. This is the “green room” where musicians can rest and recreate. They also rent out this space to the community.
  13. After a brief lunch break, I'm back on the tour at the Armoury, where I'm waiting for the next tour (I barley missed the previous one.)

    After a brief lunch break, I’m back on the tour at the Armoury, where I’m waiting for the next tour (I barley missed the previous one.)
  14. Sgt. Doug Bailey shows us the sergeants lounge which is right off the sergeants mess. There's a picture of a Guelph officer getting the Order of the British Empire from King George VI, and a Canadian flag that flew in Afghanistan.

    Sgt. Doug Bailey shows us the sergeants lounge which is right off the sergeants mess. There’s a picture of a Guelph officer getting the Order of the British Empire from King George VI, and a Canadian flag that flew in Afghanistan.
  15. Behold the Officers Mess in the Armoury, filled with all sorts of artifacts from 11th field regiment from over 100 years. Some amazing stuff here.

    Behold the Officers Mess in the Armoury, filled with all sorts of artifacts from 11th field regiment from over 100 years. Some amazing stuff here.
  16. This is the original outer wall of the Armoury, it was expanded to make room for Parade Square where the regiment floors training.

    This is the original outer wall of the Armoury, it was expanded to make room for Parade Square where the regiment floors training.
  17. This is a 25 pound gun. It went into use in 1940 and was used by artillery in the Commonwealth through World War II and the Korean War.

    This is a 25 pound gun. It went into use in 1940 and was used by artillery in the Commonwealth through World War II and the Korean War.
  18. Checking out the Petrie Building and seeing what else has been done since I was here last in February. On the walls are photos by Hans Zegerius, who's been chronically the renovations from the beginning.

    Checking out the Petrie Building and seeing what else has been done since I was here last in February. On the walls are photos by Hans Zegerius, who’s been chronically the renovations from the beginning.
  19. This was the cubicle used by Petrie himself. It's being restored to its near original condition and will be occupied by a marketing firm when it's done.

    This was the cubicle used by Petrie himself. It’s being restored to its near original condition and will be occupied by a marketing firm when it’s done.
  20. Here at 22 Stuart where the line is so long, they've cut it off. I might have to use press pass trickery to get in.

    Here at 22 Stuart where the line is so long, they’ve cut it off. I might have to use press pass trickery to get in.
  21. Outside Ker Cavan, this addition was added in the 60s using original bricks from Homewood. The door to 20 Stuart was the original door to the 2nd version of St George's church. Some bricks from there were also used on the property.

    Outside Ker Cavan, this addition was added in the 60s using original bricks from Homewood. The door to 20 Stuart was the original door to the 2nd version of St George’s church. Some bricks from there were also used on the property.
  22. Unfortunately there no pictures allowed inside Ker Cavan, but the current owner is also the owner of Guelph Soap and he has a tonne of soap memorabilia which is really quite awesome. Petrie was also once an owner of this home, and the developer of the Petrie Building named his company after the house's original name, Tyrcathlen.

    Unfortunately there no pictures allowed inside Ker Cavan, but the current owner is also the owner of Guelph Soap and he has a tonne of soap memorabilia which is really quite awesome. Petrie was also once an owner of this home, and the developer of the Petrie Building named his company after the house’s original name, Tyrcathlen.
  23. That’s a wrap for @doorsopenguelph for this year. I hope everyone enjoyed following along, and I’ll let the organist from St George’s play me off…

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